ri10k_2010yt.htm






UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC  20549

FORM 10-K
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2010
 
Commission File Number 1-13374
 
REALTY INCOME CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Maryland
 
33-0580106
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
 
(IRS Employer
Incorporation or Organization)
 
Identification Number)
 
600 La Terraza Boulevard, Escondido, California  92025-3873
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (760) 741-2111
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (b) of the Act:
 
   
Name of Each Exchange
Title of Each Class
 
On Which Registered
Common Stock, $1.00 Par Value
Class D Preferred Stock, $1.00 Par Value
Class E Preferred Stock, $1.00 Par Value
 
New York Stock Exchange
New York Stock Exchange
New York Stock Exchange
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  YES x     NO o

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  YES o     NO x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  YES x     NO o

 
 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).   YES x    NO o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer x   Accelerated filer o  Non-accelerated filer o  Smaller reporting company o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  YES o     NO x

At June 30, 2010, the aggregate market value of the Registrant’s shares of common stock, $1.00 par value, held by non-affiliates of the Registrant was $3.1 billion based upon the last reported sale price of $30.33 per share on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2010, the last business day of the Registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter.

At February 1, 2011, the number of shares of common stock outstanding was 118,200,703, the number of shares of Class D preferred stock outstanding was 5,100,000 and the number of shares of Class E preferred stock outstanding was 8,800,000.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Part III, Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 incorporate by reference certain specific portions of the definitive Proxy Statement for Realty Income Corporation’s Annual Meeting to be held on May 3, 2011, to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A. Only those portions of the proxy statement which are specifically incorporated by reference herein shall constitute a part of this annual report.

 
 

 
 
REALTY INCOME CORPORATION
Index to Form 10-K

PART I
Page
 
Item 1:
 
   
The Company                                                                                           
2
   
Recent Developments                                                                                           
3
   
Distribution Policy                                                                                           
5
   
Business Philosophy and Strategy                                                                                           
6
   
Property Portfolio Information                                                                                           
12
   
Forward-Looking Statements                                                                                           
17
 
Item 1A:
Risk Factors                                                                                                  
18
 
Item 1B:
Unresolved Staff Comments                                                                                                  
27
 
Item 2:
Properties                                                                                                  
27
 
Item 3:
Legal Proceedings                                                                                                  
27
 
Item 4:
(Removed and Reserved)                                                                                                  
27
PART II
 
 
Item 5:
27
 
Item 6:
Selected Financial Data                                                                                                  
28
 
Item 7:
 
   
General                                                                                          
29
   
Liquidity and Capital Resources                                                                                           
29
   
Results of Operations                                                                                           
34
   
42
   
Adjusted Funds from Operations Available to Common Stockholders (AFFO)                                                                                        
43
   
Impact of Inflation                                                                                           
44
   
Impact of Recent Accounting Pronouncements                                                                                           
44
 
Item 7A:
44
 
Item 8:
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data                                                                                                  
45
 
Item 9:
70
 
Item 9A:
Controls and Procedures                                                                                                  
71
 
Item 9B:
Other Information                                                                                                  
72
PART III
 
 
Item 10:
72
 
Item 11:
Executive Compensation                                                                                                  
72
 
Item 12:
72
 
Item 13:
72
 
Item 14:
Principal Accounting Fees and Services                                                                                                  
72
PART IV
 
 
Item 15:
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules                                                                                                  
73
77



PART I

Item 1:                      Business
THE COMPANY

Realty Income Corporation, The Monthly Dividend Company®, is a Maryland corporation organized to operate as an equity real estate investment trust, or REIT. Our primary business objective is to generate dependable monthly cash distributions from a consistent and predictable level of funds from operations, or FFO, per share.  Our monthly distributions are supported by the cash flow from our portfolio of properties leased to retail and other commercial enterprises. We have in-house acquisition, leasing, legal, credit research, real estate research, portfolio management and capital markets expertise. Over the past 42 years, Realty Income and its predecessors have been acquiring and owning freestanding retail and other commercial properties that generate rental revenue under long-term lease agreements (primarily 15 to 20 years).

In addition, we seek to increase distributions to stockholders and FFO per share through both active portfolio management and the acquisition of additional properties. Our portfolio management generally includes seeking:
 
  
Contractual rent increases on existing leases;
  
Rent increases at the termination of existing leases, when market conditions permit; and
  
The active management of our property portfolio, including re-leasing vacant properties, and selectively selling properties, thereby mitigating our exposure to certain tenants and markets.

In acquiring additional properties, our strategy is primarily to acquire properties that are:
 
  
Freestanding, single-tenant locations;
  
Leased to regional and national commercial enterprises; and
  
Leased under long-term, net-lease agreements.

At December 31, 2010, we owned a diversified portfolio:
 
  
Of 2,496 properties;
  
With an occupancy rate of 96.6%, or 2,412 properties occupied and only 84 properties available for lease;
  
Leased to 122 different retail and other commercial enterprises doing business in 32 separate industries;
  
Located in 49 states;
  
With over 21.2 million square feet of leasable space; and
  
With an average leasable space per property of approximately 8,500 square feet.

Of the 2,496 properties in the portfolio, 2,485, or 99.6%, are single-tenant properties, and the remaining 11 are multi-tenant, distribution and office properties. At December 31, 2010, of the 2,485 single-tenant properties, 2,402 were leased with a weighted average remaining lease term (excluding extension options) of approximately 11.4 years.

In addition, at December 31, 2010, our wholly-owned taxable REIT subsidiary, Crest Net Lease, Inc., or Crest, had an inventory of three properties valued at $3.0 million, which are classified as held for investment. No Crest properties are classified as held for sale at December 31, 2010. Crest was created to buy and sell properties, primarily to individual investors who are involved in tax-deferred exchanges under Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code. In addition to the three properties, Crest also holds notes receivable of $22.1 million at December 31, 2010.

We typically acquire properties under long-term leases with regional and national retailers and other commercial enterprises. Our acquisition and investment activities generally focus on businesses providing goods and services that satisfy basic consumer and business needs.

 
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Our net-lease agreements generally:
 
  
Are for initial terms of 15 to 20 years;
  
Require the tenant to pay minimum monthly rent and property operating expenses (taxes, insurance and maintenance); and
  
Provide for future rent increases based on increases in the consumer price index (typically subject to ceilings), additional rent calculated as a percentage of the tenants’ gross sales above a specified level, or fixed increases.

We commenced operations as a REIT on August 15, 1994 through the merger of 25 public and private real estate limited partnerships. Each of the partnerships was formed between 1970 and 1989 for the purpose of acquiring and managing long-term, net-leased properties.

Our eight senior officers owned 1.1% of our outstanding common stock with a market value of $44.5 million at February 1, 2011. Our directors and eight senior officers, as a group, owned 1.3% of our outstanding common stock with a market value of $53.9 million at February 1, 2011.

Our common stock is listed on The New York Stock Exchange, or NYSE, under the ticker symbol "O" with a cusip number of 756109-104. Our central index key number is 726728.

Our Class D cumulative redeemable preferred stock is listed on the NYSE under the ticker symbol "OprD" with a cusip number of 756109-609.

Our Class E cumulative redeemable preferred stock is listed on the NYSE under the ticker symbol "OprE" with a cusip number of 756109-708.

In February 2011, we had 79 employees as compared to 72 employees in February 2010.

We maintain an Internet website at www.realtyincome.com. On our website we make available, free of charge, copies of our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, Forms 3, 4, 5, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file these reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC.  None of the information on our website is deemed to be part of this report.


RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Increases in Monthly Distributions to Common Stockholders
We have continued our 42-year policy of paying distributions monthly. Monthly distributions per share increased in April 2010 by $0.0003125 to $0.1433125, in July 2010 by $0.0003125 to $0.143625, in October 2010 by $0.0003125 to $0.1439375 and in January 2011 by $0.0003125 to $0.14425. The increase in January 2011 was our 53rd consecutive quarterly increase and the 60th increase in the amount of our dividend since our listing on the NYSE in 1994. In 2010, we paid three monthly cash distributions per share in the amount of $0.143, three in the amount of $0.1433125, three in the amount of $0.143625 and three in the amount of $0.1439375, totaling $1.721625. In December 2010, January 2011 and February 2011, we declared distributions of $0.14425 per share, which were paid in January 2011 and will be paid in February 2011 and March 2011, respectively.

The current monthly distribution of $0.14425 per share represents an annualized distribution of $1.731 per share, and an annualized distribution yield of approximately 5.1% based on the last reported sale price of our common stock on the NYSE of $34.20 on December 31, 2010. Although we expect to continue our policy of paying monthly distributions, we cannot guarantee that we will maintain our current level of distributions, that we will continue our pattern of increasing distributions per share, or what our actual distribution yield will be in any future period.


Acquisitions During 2010
During 2010, we invested $713.5 million in 186 new properties with an initial weighted average contractual lease rate of 7.9%. These 186 properties are located in 14 states, contain over 2.2 million leasable square feet, and are 100% leased with an average lease term of 15.7 years. The 186 new properties we acquired are net-leased to commercial enterprises in the following 13 industries: apparel stores, automotive collision services, automotive service, crafts and novelties, consumer electronics, convenience store, drug stores, grocery stores, health and fitness, office supplies, restaurants, sporting goods and wine and spirits. There were no acquisitions by Crest in 2010.

The initial weighted average contractual lease rate is computed as estimated contractual net operating income (in a net-leased property that is equal to the aggregate base rent) for the first year of each lease, divided by the estimated total cost of the properties. Since it is possible that a tenant could default on the payment of contractual rent, we cannot assure you that the actual return on the funds invested will remain at the percentages listed above.

Included in the $713.5 million invested during 2010 are the following acquisitions:
 
  
The acquisition and leaseback of approximately $304.1 million of winery and vineyard properties under 20-year, triple-net lease agreements with Diageo Chateau & Estates Wine Company, guaranteed by Diageo plc, or, together with its subsidiaries, Diageo.  The properties are primarily located in California’s Napa Valley and include two wineries that produce wines for Diageo’s Sterling Vineyards, or Sterling, and Beaulieu Vineyards, or BV, brands and 14 vineyards producing grapes for their Sterling, BV and other brands.  The properties include approximately 3,600 acres and 426,000 square feet of winery, production, storage, shipping and tourist buildings.  Diageo will continue to operate the wineries and vineyards.  As a result of this acquisition of properties, Diageo has become our largest tenant based on rental revenue.  Headquartered in London, Diageo is a global premium drinks company with a well-known portfolio of international brands of spirits, beer and wine.  Diageo ordinary shares trade on the London Stock Exchange under the symbol “DGE.L” and on the NYSE under the symbol “DEO.”
  
The acquisition of 23 retail properties leased to 13 tenants in six states, for approximately $126.5 million, under long-term, net lease agreements.  The properties are in eight different industries, including apparel stores, consumer electronics, crafts and novelties, drug stores, grocery stores, health and fitness, office supplies, and sporting goods.  All of the properties acquired have in-place leases.
  
The acquisition of 135 SuperAmerica convenience stores and one support facility, for approximately $247.6 million, under long-term, triple-net lease agreements. The stores are located in Minnesota and Wisconsin, and average approximately 3,500 leasable square feet on approximately 1.14 acres.
  
The remaining 11 properties acquired totaled approximately $35.3 million.

Investments in Existing Properties
In 2010, we capitalized costs of $3.6 million on existing properties in our portfolio, consisting of $1.5 million for re-leasing costs and $2.1 million for building improvements.

$425 Million Acquisition Credit Facility
In December 2010, we entered into a new $425 million acquisition credit facility that replaced our previous $355 million acquisition credit facility that was scheduled to expire in May 2011.  The initial term of the new credit facility expires in March 2014 and includes two, one-year extension options.  Under the new credit facility, our investment grade credit ratings provide for financing at London Interbank Offered Rate, commonly referred to as LIBOR, plus 185 basis points with a facility commitment fee of 35 basis points, for all-in drawn pricing of 220 basis points over LIBOR. We also have other interest rate options available to us.  Our credit facility is unsecured and, accordingly, we have not pledged any assets as collateral for this obligation.  At December 31, 2010, there were no borrowings on our credit facility, but if there were, the effective borrowing rate would have been 2.1%.

Issuance of Common Stock
In December 2010, we issued 7,360,000 shares of common stock at a price of $33.70 per share.  The net proceeds of approximately $235.7 million were used to repay borrowings of $179.8 million under our acquisition credit facility and to fund property acquisitions during December 2010.  The remaining net proceeds were used for general corporate purposes and working capital.


In September 2010, we issued 6,198,500 shares of common stock at a price of $33.40 per share.  The net proceeds of approximately $196.9 million were used to repay borrowings of $49.7 million under our acquisition credit facility and to fund $126.5 million of property acquisitions during October 2010.  The remaining net proceeds were used for general corporate purposes and working capital.

Note Issuance
In June 2010, we issued $250.0 million aggregate principal amount of 5.75% senior unsecured notes due January 2021, or the 2021 Notes.  The price to the investor for the 2021 Notes was 99.404% of the principal amount for an effective yield of 5.826%.  The net proceeds of approximately $246.1 million from this offering were used to repay borrowings under our acquisition credit facility, which were used to finance the acquisition of the Diageo properties.  Interest is paid semiannually on the 2021 Notes.

Net Income Available to Common Stockholders
Net income available to common stockholders was $106.5 million in 2010 versus $106.9 million in 2009, a decrease of $343,000. On a diluted per common share basis, net income was $1.01 in 2010 as compared to $1.03 in 2009.

The calculation to determine net income available to common stockholders includes gains from the sale of properties. The amount of gains varies from period to period based on the timing of property sales and can significantly impact net income available to common stockholders.

The gain from the sale of properties during 2010 was $8.7 million, as compared to $8.1 million during 2009.

Funds from Operations Available to Common Stockholders (FFO)
In 2010, our FFO increased by $3.3 million, or 1.7%, to $193.7 million versus $190.4 million in 2009.  On a diluted per common share basis, FFO was $1.83 in 2010 compared to $1.84 in 2009, a decrease of $0.01, or 0.5%.

See our discussion of FFO in the section entitled "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in this annual report, which includes a reconciliation of net income available to common stockholders to FFO.

Adjusted Funds from Operations Available to Common Stockholders (AFFO)
In 2010, our AFFO increased by $4.6 million, or 2.4%, to $197.3 million versus $192.7 million in 2009. On a diluted per common share basis, AFFO was $1.86 in 2010 and 2009.

See our discussion of AFFO in the section entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this annual report, which includes a reconciliation of net income available to common stockholders to FFO and AFFO.
 

DISTRIBUTION POLICY

Distributions are paid monthly to our common, Class D preferred and Class E preferred stockholders if, and when, declared by our Board of Directors.

In order to maintain our tax status as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we generally are required to distribute dividends to our stockholders aggregating annually at least 90% of our REIT taxable income (determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding net capital gains), and we are subject to income tax to the extent we distribute less than 100% of our REIT taxable income (including net capital gains). In 2010, our cash distributions totaled $206.8 million, or approximately 136.3% of our estimated REIT taxable income of $151.7 million. Our estimated REIT taxable income reflects non-cash deductions for depreciation and amortization. Our estimated REIT taxable income is presented to show our compliance with REIT distribution requirements and is not a measure of our liquidity or performance.


We intend to continue to make distributions to our stockholders that are sufficient to meet this distribution requirement and that will reduce our exposure to income taxes. Furthermore, we believe our funds from operations are more than sufficient to support our current level of cash distributions to our stockholders. Our 2010 cash distributions to common stockholders totaled $182.5 million, representing 94.2% of our funds from operations available to common stockholders of $193.7 million.

The Class D preferred stockholders receive cumulative distributions at a rate of 7.375% per annum on the $25 per share liquidation preference (equivalent to $1.84375 per annum per share). The Class E preferred stockholders receive cumulative distributions at a rate of 6.75% per annum on the $25 per share liquidation preference (equivalent to $1.6875 per annum per share). Dividends on our Class D and Class E preferred stock are current.

Future distributions will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, FFO, cash flow from operations, financial condition and capital requirements, the annual distribution requirements under the REIT provisions of the Code, our debt service requirements and any other factors the Board of Directors may deem relevant. In addition, our credit facility contains financial covenants that could limit the amount of distributions payable by us in the event of a default, and which prohibit the payment of distributions on the common or preferred stock in the event that we fail to pay when due (subject to any applicable grace period) any principal or interest on borrowings under our credit facility.

Distributions of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for federal income tax purposes generally will be taxable to stockholders as ordinary income, except to the extent that we recognize capital gains and declare a capital gains dividend, or that such amounts constitute "qualified dividend income" subject to a reduced rate of tax. The maximum tax rate of non-corporate taxpayers for "qualified dividend income" has generally been reduced to 15% (until it “sunsets” or reverts to the provisions of prior law, which under current law will occur with respect to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012). In general, dividends payable by REITs are not eligible for the reduced tax rate on corporate dividends, except to the extent the REIT’s dividends are attributable to dividends received from taxable corporations (such as our taxable REIT subsidiary, Crest), to income that was subject to tax at the corporate or REIT level (for example, if we distribute taxable income that we retained and paid tax on in the prior taxable year) or, as discussed above, dividends properly designated by us as "capital gain dividends." Distributions in excess of earnings and profits generally will be treated as a non-taxable reduction in the stockholders' basis in their stock. Distributions above that basis, generally, will be taxable as a capital gain to stockholders who hold their shares as a capital asset. Approximately 26.8% of the distributions to our common stockholders, made or deemed to have been made in 2010, were classified as a return of capital for federal income tax purposes. We are unable to predict the portion of future distributions that may be classified as a return of capital.
 

BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY AND STRATEGY

Capital Philosophy
Historically, we have met our long-term capital needs by issuing common stock, preferred stock and long-term unsecured notes and bonds. Over the long term, we believe that common stock should be the majority of our capital structure. However, we may issue additional preferred stock or debt securities from time to time. We may issue common stock when we believe that our share price is at a level that allows for the proceeds of any offering to be accretively invested into additional properties. In addition, we may issue common stock to permanently finance properties that were financed by our credit facility or debt securities. However, we cannot assure you that we will have access to the capital markets at times and at terms that are acceptable to us.

Conservative Capital Structure
We believe that our stockholders are best served by a conservative capital structure. Therefore, we seek to maintain a conservative debt level on our balance sheet and solid interest and fixed charge coverage ratios. At December 31, 2010, our total outstanding borrowings were $1.6 billion of senior unsecured notes, or approximately 26.7% of our total market capitalization of $5.99 billion. There were no outstanding borrowings on our credit facility at December 31, 2010.


We define our total market capitalization at December 31, 2010 as the sum of:
 
  
Shares of our common stock outstanding of 118,058,988 multiplied by the last reported NYSE sales price of $34.20 per share on December 31, 2010, or $4.04 billion;
  
Aggregate liquidation value (par value of $25 per share) of the Class D preferred stock of $127.5 million;
  
Aggregate liquidation value (par value of $25 per share) of the Class E preferred stock of $220 million; and
  
Outstanding notes of $1.6 billion.

Investment Philosophy
We believe that owning an actively managed, diversified portfolio of commercial properties under long-term, net leases produces consistent and predictable income. Net leases typically require the tenant to be responsible for monthly rent and property operating expenses including property taxes, insurance and maintenance. In addition, tenants are typically responsible for future rent increases based on increases in the consumer price index (typically subject to ceilings), additional rent calculated as a percentage of the tenants' gross sales above a specified level, or fixed increases. We believe that a portfolio of properties under long-term leases, coupled with the tenant's responsibility for property expenses, generally produces a more predictable income stream than many other types of real estate portfolios, while continuing to offer the potential for growth in rental income.

Investment Strategy
When identifying new properties for acquisition, our focus is generally on providing capital to owners and operators of retail and other commercial enterprises by acquiring, then leasing back, the real estate they consider important to the successful operation of their business. We categorize tenants as: 1) venture market, 2) middle market, and 3) upper market. Venture companies typically offer a newer concept, generally in one geographic region of the country and operate between five and 50 locations. Middle market companies typically have 50 to 500 locations, operations in more than one geographic region, have been successful through one or more economic cycles, and have a proven, replicable concept. The upper market tenants typically consist of companies with 500 or more locations, operating a proven, mature concept. Upper market tenants generally have strong operating histories and access to several sources of capital.

We primarily focus on acquiring properties leased to middle market retail and other commercial enterprises that we believe are attractive for investment because:

  
They generally have overcome many of the operational and managerial obstacles that can adversely affect new venture companies;
  
They typically require capital to fund expansion but have more limited financing options than upper market tenants;
  
They generally have provided us with attractive risk-adjusted returns over time since their financial strength has, in many cases, tended to improve as their businesses have grown;
  
Their relatively large size allows them to spread corporate expenses across a greater number of locations; and
  
Middle market tenants typically have the critical mass to survive during economic or market dislocations.

Historically, our investment focus has primarily been on retail and other commercial enterprises that have a service component because we believe the lease revenue from these types of businesses is more stable. Because of this investment focus, for the quarter ended December 31, 2010, approximately 78% of our rental revenue was derived from tenants with a service component in their business. We believe these service-oriented businesses would be difficult to duplicate over the Internet and that our properties continue to perform well relative to competition from Internet-based businesses.

Credit Strategy
We primarily provide sale-leaseback financing to less than investment grade tenants. We typically acquire and lease back properties to regional and national commercial enterprises and believe that within this market we can achieve an attractive risk-adjusted return. Since 1970, our overall weighted average occupancy rate at the end of each year has been 98.2%, and our occupancy rate at the end of each year has never been below 96%.

 
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We believe the principal financial obligations of most commercial enterprises typically include their bank and other debt, payment obligations to suppliers and real estate lease obligations. Because we typically own the land and building in which a tenant conducts its business, we believe the risk of default on a tenants’ lease obligations is less than the tenants' unsecured general obligations. It has been our experience that since tenants must retain their profitable locations in order to survive, in the event of reorganization they are less likely to reject a lease for a profitable location because this would terminate their right to use the property. Thus, as the property owner, we believe we will fare better than unsecured creditors of the same tenant in the event of reorganization. If a property is rejected by the tenant during reorganization, we own the property and can either lease it to a new tenant or sell the property. In addition, we believe that the risk of default on the real estate leases can be further mitigated by monitoring the performance of the tenants' individual unit locations and considering whether to sell locations that are weaker performers.

In order to qualify for inclusion in our portfolio, new property acquisitions must meet stringent investment and credit requirements. The properties must generate attractive current yields and the tenant must meet our credit profile.  We have established a three-part analysis that examines each potential investment based on:
 
  
Industry, company, market conditions and credit profile;
  
Store profitability, if profitability data is available, and the importance of the location of the real estate to the operations of the company’s business; and
  
Overall real estate characteristics, including property value and comparative rental rates.

The typical profile of companies whose properties have been approved for acquisition are those with 50 or more locations. Generally the properties:

  
Are located in highly visible areas;
  
Have easy access to major thoroughfares; and
  
Have attractive demographics.

Acquisition Strategy
We seek to invest in industries in which several, well-organized, regional and national retailers and other commercial enterprises are capturing market share through service, quality control, economies of scale, strong consumer brands, advertising, and the selection of prime locations. We execute our acquisition strategy by acting as a source of capital to regional and national commercial enterprises by acquiring and leasing back their real estate locations. We undertake thorough research and analysis to identify what we consider to be appropriate industries, tenants and property locations for investment. Our research expertise is instrumental to uncovering net-lease opportunities in markets where our real estate financing program adds value. In selecting real estate for potential investment, we generally seek to acquire properties that have the following characteristics:
 
  
Freestanding, commercially-zoned property with a single tenant;
  
Properties that are important locations for regional and national commercial enterprises;
  
Properties that we deem to be profitable for the tenants and/or can generally be characterized as important to the operations of the company’s business;
  
Properties that are located within attractive demographic areas relative to the business of our tenants, with high visibility and easy access to major thoroughfares; and
  
Properties that can be purchased with the simultaneous execution or assumption of long-term, net-lease agreements, offering both current income and the potential for rent increases.

Impact of Real Estate and Credit Markets
In the commercial real estate market, property prices generally continue to fluctuate. Likewise, the U.S. credit markets have experienced significant price volatility, dislocations and liquidity disruptions, which sometimes impact our access to and cost of capital. We continue to monitor the commercial real estate and U.S. credit markets carefully and, if required, will make decisions to adjust our business strategy accordingly. See Item 1A entitled "Risk Factors" in this annual report.


Portfolio Management Strategy
The active management of the property portfolio is an essential component of our long-term strategy. We continually monitor our portfolio for any changes that could affect the performance of the industries, tenants and locations in which we have invested. We also regularly analyze our portfolio with a view toward optimizing its returns and enhancing our credit quality.

Our executives regularly review and analyze:
 
  
The performance of the various industries of our tenants; and
  
The operation, management, business planning, and financial condition of our tenants.

We have an active portfolio management program that incorporates the sale of assets when we believe the reinvestment of the sale proceeds will:

  
Generate higher returns;
  
Enhance the credit quality of our real estate portfolio;
  
Extend our average remaining lease term; or
  
Decrease tenant or industry concentration.

At December 31, 2010, we classified real estate with a carrying amount of $3.6 million as held for sale on our balance sheet. Additionally, we anticipate selling investment properties from our portfolio that have not yet been specifically identified, from which we anticipate receiving between $10 million and $35 million in proceeds during the next 12 months. We intend to invest these proceeds into new property acquisitions, if there are attractive opportunities available. However, we cannot guarantee that we will sell properties during the next 12 months or be able to invest the proceeds from the sales of any properties in new properties.

Universal Shelf Registration
In March 2009, we filed a shelf registration statement with the SEC, which expires in March 2012. In accordance with the SEC rules, the amount of securities to be issued pursuant to this shelf registration statement was not specified when it was filed and there is no specific dollar limit. The securities covered by this registration statement include common stock, preferred stock, debt securities, or any combination of these securities. We may periodically offer one or more of these securities in amounts, prices and on terms to be announced when and if the securities are offered. The specifics of any future offerings, along with the use of proceeds of any securities offered, will be described in detail in a prospectus supplement, or other offering materials, at the time of any offering.

$425 Million Acquisition Credit Facility
In December 2010, we entered into a new $425 million revolving, unsecured credit facility that replaced our previous $355 million acquisition credit facility that was scheduled to expire in May 2011. The initial term of the new credit facility expires in March 2014 and includes two, one-year extension options. Under the new credit facility, our investment grade credit ratings provide for financing at LIBOR, plus 185 basis points with a facility commitment fee of 35 basis points, for all-in drawn pricing of 220 basis points over LIBOR. We also have other interest rate options available to us.  Our credit facility is unsecured and, accordingly, we have not pledged any assets as collateral for this obligation. At December 31, 2010, we had a borrowing capacity of $425 million available on our credit facility and no outstanding balance.  If there were outstanding borrowings, the effective borrowing rate would have been 2.1%.

We expect to use our credit facility to acquire additional properties and for other corporate purposes. Any additional borrowings will increase our exposure to interest rate risk. We have the right to request an increase in the borrowing capacity of the credit facility, up to $200 million, to a total borrowing capacity of $625 million.  Any increase in the borrowing capacity is subject to approval by the banks participating in our credit facility.

 
-9-

 
We generally use our credit facility for the short-term financing of new property acquisitions. Thereafter, when capital is available on acceptable terms, we generally seek to refinance those borrowings with the net proceeds of long-term or permanent financing, which may include the issuance of common stock, preferred stock or debt securities. We cannot assure you, however, that we will be able to obtain any such refinancing, or that market conditions prevailing at the time of refinancing will enable us to issue equity or debt securities upon acceptable terms.
 
Credit Agency Ratings
The borrowing rates under our credit facility are based upon our credit ratings.  We are currently assigned the following investment grade credit ratings on our senior unsecured notes: Fitch Ratings has assigned a rating of BBB+, Moody’s Investors Service has assigned a rating of Baa1 and Standard & Poor’s Ratings Group has assigned a rating of BBB to our senior notes. All of these ratings have "stable" outlooks.

Based on our current ratings, the current facility interest rate is LIBOR plus 185 basis points with a facility commitment fee of 35 basis points, for all-in drawn pricing of 220 basis points over LIBOR.  The credit facility provides that the interest rate can range between: (i) LIBOR plus 300 basis points if our credit facility is lower than BBB-/Baa3 and (ii) LIBOR plus 175 basis points if our credit rating is A-/A3 or higher.  In addition, our credit facility provides for a facility commitment fee based on our credit ratings, which ranges from: (i) 50 basis points for a rating lower than BBB-/Baa3, and (ii) 30 basis points for a credit rating of A-/A3 or higher.

We also issue senior debt securities from time to time and our credit ratings can impact the interest rates charged in those transactions.  If our credit ratings or ratings outlook change, our cost to obtain debt financing could increase or decrease.

The credit ratings assigned to us could change based upon, among other things, our results of operations and financial condition. These ratings are subject to ongoing evaluation by credit rating agencies and we cannot assure you that our ratings will not be changed or withdrawn by a rating agency in the future if, in its judgment, circumstances warrant. Moreover, a rating is not a recommendation to buy, sell or hold our debt securities, preferred stock or common stock.

Mortgage Debt
We have no mortgage debt on any of our properties.

No Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements or Unconsolidated Investments
We have no unconsolidated or off-balance sheet investments in "variable interest entities" or off-balance sheet financing, nor do we engage in trading activities involving energy or commodity contracts or other derivative instruments. Additionally, we have no joint ventures or mandatorily redeemable preferred stock. As such, our financial position and results of operations are not affected by accounting regulations regarding the consolidation of off-balance sheet entities and classification of financial instruments with characteristics of both liabilities and equity.

Competitive Strategy
We believe that to successfully pursue our investment philosophy and strategy, we must seek to maintain the following competitive advantages:

  
Size and Type of Investment Properties: We believe smaller ($500,000 to $10,000,000) net-leased properties, whether purchased individually or as part of larger portfolio purchases, represent an attractive investment opportunity in today's real estate environment. Due to the complexities of acquiring and managing a large portfolio of relatively small assets, we believe these types of properties have not experienced significant institutional ownership interest or the corresponding yield reduction experienced by larger income-producing properties. We believe the less intensive day-to-day property management required by net-lease agreements, coupled with the active management of a large portfolio of smaller properties, is an effective investment strategy. The tenants of our freestanding properties generally provide goods and services that satisfy basic consumer needs. In order to grow and expand, they generally need capital. Since the acquisition of real estate is typically the single largest capital expenditure of many of these tenants, our method of purchasing the property and then leasing it back, under a net-lease arrangement, allows the commercial enterprise to free up capital.

 
  
Investment in New Industries: We will seek to further diversify our portfolio among a variety of industries. We believe diversification will allow us to invest in industries that currently are growing and have characteristics we find attractive. When analyzing new industries, we seek to acquire properties which are critical to the success of a commercial enterprise, through its distribution of the product or service. Other characteristics may include, but are not limited to, industries that are dominated by local store operators where regional and national store operators and other commercial enterprises can increase market share and dominance by consolidating local operators and streamlining their operations, as well as capitalizing on major demographic shifts in a population base.

  
Diversification: Diversification of the portfolio by industry type, tenant, and geographic location is key to our objective of providing predictable investment results for our stockholders, therefore further diversification of our portfolio is a continuing objective. At December 31, 2010, we owned a diversified property portfolio that consisted of 2,496 properties located in 49 states, leased to 122 different retail and other commercial enterprises doing business in 32 industry segments. Each of the 32 industry segments, represented in our property portfolio, individually accounted for no more than 19.1% of our rental revenue for the quarter ended December 31, 2010.

  
Management Specialization: We believe that our management's specialization in acquiring and managing single-tenant properties, operated under net-lease agreements, purchased individually or as part of a larger portfolio, is important to meeting our objectives. We plan to maintain this specialization and will seek to employ and train high-quality professionals in this specialized area of real estate ownership, finance and management.

  
Technology: We intend to stay at the forefront of technology in our efforts to carry out our operations efficiently and economically. We maintain sophisticated information systems that allow us to analyze our portfolio's performance and actively manage our investments. We believe that technology and information-based systems play an important role in our competitiveness as an investment manager and source of capital to a variety of industries and tenants.


PROPERTY PORTFOLIO INFORMATION

At December 31, 2010, we owned a diversified portfolio:

  
Of 2,496 properties;
  
With an occupancy rate of 96.6%, or 2,412 properties occupied and only 84 properties available for lease;
  
Leased to 122 different retail and other commercial enterprises doing business in 32 separate industries;
  
Located in 49 states;
  
With over 21.2 million square feet of leasable space; and
  
With an average leasable space per property of approximately 8,500 square feet.

In addition to our real estate portfolio, our subsidiary, Crest, had an inventory of three properties located in three states at December 31, 2010. These properties are valued at $3.0 million and are classified as held for investment. No Crest properties are classified as held for sale at December 31, 2010.

At December 31, 2010, of our 2,496 properties, 2,402 were leased under net-lease agreements. A net lease typically requires the tenant to be responsible for minimum monthly rent and property operating expenses including property taxes, insurance and maintenance. In addition, our tenants are typically responsible for future rent increases based on increases in the consumer price index (typically subject to ceilings), additional rent calculated as a percentage of the tenants' gross sales above a specified level, or fixed increases.

Our net-lease agreements generally:
 
  
Are for initial terms of 15 to 20 years;
  
Require the tenant to pay minimum monthly rents and property operating expenses (taxes, insurance and maintenance); and
  
Provide for future rent increases based on increases in the consumer price index (typically subject to ceilings), additional rent calculated as a percentage of the tenants' gross sales above a specified level, or fixed increases. Where leases provide for rent increases based on increases in the consumer price index, generally these increases become part of the new permanent base rent. Where leases provide for percentage rent, this additional rent is typically payable only if the tenants' gross sales, for a given period (usually one year), exceed a specified level and is then typically calculated as a percentage of only the amount of gross sales in excess of that level.



Industry Diversification
The following table sets forth certain information regarding Realty Income’s property portfolio (excluding properties owned by Crest) classified according to the business of the respective tenants, expressed as a percentage of our total rental revenue:
   
Percentage of Rental Revenue(1)
 
   
For the Quarter
   
For the Years Ended
 
 
Industries
 
Ended
December 31,
2010
   
Dec 31,
2010
   
Dec 31,
2009
   
Dec 31,
2008
   
Dec 31,
2007
   
Dec 31,
2006
   
Dec 31,
2005
 
Apparel stores
    1.5 %     1.2 %     1.1 %     1.1 %     1.2 %     1.7 %     1.6 %
Automotive collision services
    1.0       1.0       1.1       1.0       1.1       1.3       1.3  
Automotive parts
    1.5       1.4       1.5       1.6       2.1       2.8       3.4  
Automotive service
    4.5       4.7       4.8       4.8       5.2       6.9       7.6  
Automotive tire services
    5.9       6.4       6.9       6.7       7.3       6.1       7.2  
Book stores
    0.1       0.1       0.2       0.2       0.2       0.2       0.3  
Business services
    *       *       *       *       0.1       0.1       0.1  
Child care
    5.9       6.5       7.3       7.6       8.4       10.3       12.7  
Consumer electronics
    0.6       0.6       0.7       0.8       0.9       1.1       1.3  
Convenience stores
    17.4       17.1       16.9       15.8       14.0       16.1       18.7  
Crafts and novelties
    0.3       0.3       0.3       0.3       0.3       0.4       0.4  
Distribution and office
    1.0       1.0       1.0       1.0       0.6       --       --  
Drug stores
    3.9       4.1       4.3       4.1       2.7       2.9       2.8  
Entertainment
    1.1       1.2       1.3       1.2       1.4       1.6       2.1  
Equipment rental services
    0.2       0.2       0.2       0.2       0.2       0.2       0.4  
Financial services
    0.2       0.2       0.2       0.2       0.2       0.1       0.1  
General merchandise
    0.7       0.8       0.8       0.8       0.7       0.6       0.5  
Grocery stores
    1.5       0.9       0.7       0.7       0.7       0.7       0.7  
Health and fitness
    6.7       6.9       5.9       5.6       5.1       4.3       3.7  
Home furnishings
    1.2       1.3       1.3       2.4       2.6       3.1       3.7  
Home improvement
    1.6       1.7       1.9       1.9       2.1       3.4       1.1  
Motor vehicle dealerships
    2.4       2.6       2.7       3.1       3.1       3.4       2.6  
Office supplies
    1.0       0.9       1.0       1.0       1.1       1.3       1.5  
Pet supplies and services
    0.8       0.9       0.9       0.8       0.9       1.1       1.3  
Private education
    0.8       0.8       0.9       0.8       0.8       0.8       0.8  
Restaurants
    19.1       20.4       21.3       21.8       21.2       11.9       9.4  
Shoe stores
    0.2       0.1       --       --       --       --       0.3  
Sporting goods
    2.9       2.7       2.6       2.3       2.6       2.9       3.4  
Theaters
    8.6       8.9       9.2       9.0       9.0       9.6       5.2  
Travel plazas
    0.2       0.2       0.2       0.2       0.2       0.3       0.3  
Video rental
    0.0       0.2       1.0       1.1       1.7       2.1       2.5  
Wine and spirits
    5.6       3.0       --       --       --       --       --  
Other
    1.6       1.7       1.8       1.9       2.3       2.7       3.0  
Totals
    100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
 
 
* Less than 0.1%
 
 (1)
Includes rental revenue for all properties owned by Realty Income at the end of each period presented, including revenue from properties reclassified as discontinued operations.


Service Category Diversification
The following table sets forth certain information regarding the properties owned by Realty Income (excluding properties owned by Crest) at December 31, 2010, classified according to the business types and the level of services they provide (dollars in thousands):
         
Rental Revenue for
   
Percentage of
 
   
Number of
   
the Quarter Ended
   
Rental
 
Industry
 
Properties
   
December 31, 2010(1)
   
Revenue
 
Tenants Providing Services
                 
Automotive collision services
    14     $ 893       1.0 %
Automotive service
    240       4,113       4.5  
Child care
    250       5,467       5.9  
Entertainment
    8       1,064       1.1  
Equipment rental services
    2       150       0.2  
Financial services
    12       193       0.2  
Health and fitness
    34       6,182       6.7  
Private education
    11       730       0.8  
Theaters
    34       7,944       8.6  
Other
    13       1,456       1.6  
      618       28,192       30.6  
Tenants Selling Goods and Services
                 
Automotive parts (with installation)
    25       449       0.5  
Automotive tire services
    154       5,468       5.9  
Business services
    1       5       *  
Convenience stores
    720       16,046       17.4  
Distribution and office
    4       919       1.0  
Home improvement
    1       27       *  
Motor vehicle dealerships
    17       2,228       2.4  
Pet supplies and services
    12       709       0.8  
Restaurants
    631       17,601       19.1  
Travel plazas
    1       187       0.2  
Video rental
    15       0       0.0  
      1,581       43,639       47.3  
Tenants Selling Goods
                       
Apparel stores
    11       1,365       1.5  
Automotive parts
    43       898       1.0  
Book stores
    1       128       0.1  
Consumer electronics
    9       521       0.6  
Crafts and novelties
    5       234       0.3  
Drug stores
    52       3,619       3.9  
General merchandise
    33       691       0.7  
Grocery stores
    21       1,397       1.5  
Home furnishings
    42       1,149       1.2  
Home improvement
    28       1,464       1.6  
Office supplies
    11       880       1.0  
Pet supplies
    3       33       *  
Shoe stores
    1       168       0.2  
Sporting goods
    21       2,650       2.9  
Wine and spirits
    16       5,134       5.6  
      297       20,331       22.1  
Totals
    2,496     $ 92,162       100.0 %

 
* Less than 0.1%
 
 
 (1)
Includes rental revenue for all properties owned by Realty Income at December 31, 2010, including revenue from properties reclassified as discontinued operations of $98. Excludes revenue of $80 for properties owned by Crest.

 
Lease Expirations
The following table sets forth certain information regarding Realty Income’s property portfolio (excluding properties owned by Crest) regarding the timing of the lease term expirations (excluding extension options) on our 2,402 net leased, single-tenant properties as of December 31, 2010 (dollars in thousands):

   
Total Portfolio
   
Initial Expirations(3)
   
Subsequent Expirations(4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year
 
Total
Number of Leases
Expiring(1)
   
Rental
Revenue
 for the
Quarter
Ended
 December 31, 2010(2)
   
% of
Total
 Rental
 Revenue
   
Number
of Leases
 Expiring
   
Rental
 Revenue
for the
Quarter
 Ended December 31, 2010
   
% of 
Total 
 Rental 
 Revenue 
     
 
Number
 of Leases Expiring
   
Rental
 Revenue
for the
Quarter
Ended
 December 31, 2010
   
% of
Total
 Rental
 Revenue
 
2011
    164     $ 4,144       4.6 %     58     $ 1,975       2.2 %     106     $ 2,169       2.4 %
2012
    127       2,908       3.2       37       1,031       1.1       90       1,877       2.1  
2013
    147       4,947       5.5       65       2,961       3.3       82       1,986       2.2  
2014
    111       3,489       3.8       41       1,861       2.0       70       1,628       1.8  
2015
    147       3,768       4.2       78       2,205       2.5       69       1,563       1.7  
2016
    130       2,516       2.8       111       2,107       2.3       19       409       0.5  
2017
    51       1,904       2.1       40       1,681       1.9       11       223       0.2  
2018
    46       2,230       2.5       38       2,027       2.3       8       203       0.2  
2019
    98       5,089       5.6       90       4,659       5.1       8       430       0.5  
2020
    86       4,208       4.6       75       3,605       4.0       11       603       0.6  
2021
    177       7,592       8.4       176       7,538       8.3       1       54       0.1  
2022
    100       3,072       3.4       99       3,024       3.3       1       48       0.1  
2023
    253       8,779       9.7       251       8,706       9.6       2       73       0.1  
2024
    64       2,348       2.6       64       2,348       2.6       --       --       --  
2025
    208       7,684       8.5       203       7,557       8.4       5       127       0.1  
2026
    109       6,378       7.1       107       6,319       7.0       2       59       0.1  
2027
    169       5,572       6.1       168       5,555       6.1       1       17       *  
2028
    81       4,119       4.5       79       4,069       4.4       2       50       0.1  
2029
    49       1,290       1.4       48       1,275       1.4       1       15       *  
2030
    43       6,163       6.8       43       6,163       6.8       --       --       --  
2031
    27       663       0.7       27       663       0.7       --       --       --  
2032
    2       655       0.7       2       655       0.7       --       --       --  
2033
    7       460       0.5       7       460       0.5       --       --       --  
2034
    3       281       0.3       3       281       0.3       --       --       --  
2037
    2       354       0.4       2       354       0.4       --       --       --  
2043
    1       13       *       --       --       --       1       13       *  
Totals
    2,402     $ 90,626       100.0 %     1,912     $ 79,079       87.2 %     490     $ 11,547       12.8 %
 
*Less than 0.1%
 
 (1)
Excludes ten multi-tenant properties and 84 vacant unleased properties, one of which is a multi-tenant property. The lease expirations for properties under construction are based on the estimated date of completion of those properties.
 (2)
Includes rental revenue of $98 from properties reclassified as discontinued operations and excludes revenue of $1,536 from ten multi-tenant properties and from 84 vacant and unleased properties at December 31, 2010. Excludes revenue of $80 from properties owned by Crest.
 (3)
Represents leases to the initial tenant of the property that are expiring for the first time.
 (4)
Represents lease expirations on properties in the portfolio, which have previously been renewed, extended or re-tenanted.

 
State Diversification
The following table sets forth certain state-by-state information regarding Realty Income’s property portfolio (excluding properties owned by Crest) as of December 31, 2010 (dollars in thousands):
 
               
Approximate
   
Rental Revenue for
   
Percentage of
 
   
Number of
   
Percent
   
Leasable
   
the Quarter Ended
   
Rental
 
State
 
Properties
   
Leased
   
Square Feet
   
December 31, 2010(1)
   
Revenue
 
Alabama
    62       97 %     420,200     $ 1,861       2.0 %
Alaska
    2       100       128,500       287       0.3  
Arizona
    82       98       509,300       2,740       3.0  
Arkansas
    17       94       92,400       380       0.4  
California
    82       98       1,675,500       9,987       10.8  
Colorado
    51       94       471,400       1,804       2.0  
Connecticut
    23       96       269,100       1,156       1.3  
Delaware
    17       100       33,300       431       0.5  
Florida
    169       93       1,621,000       6,903       7.5  
Georgia
    131       95       905,500       3,809       4.1  
Hawaii
    --       --       --       --       --  
Idaho
    12       100       80,700       339       0.4  
Illinois
    84       99       998,500       5,107       5.5  
Indiana
    81       95       729,900       3,512       3.8  
Iowa
    21       100       290,600       1,018       1.1  
Kansas
    31       90       562,500       1,043       1.1  
Kentucky
    22       95       110,600       647       0.7  
Louisiana
    32       100       184,900       947       1.0  
Maine
    3       100       22,500       162       0.2  
Maryland
    28       100       266,600       1,661       1.8  
Massachusetts
    64       98       575,400       2,558       2.8  
Michigan
    52       100       257,300       1,287       1.4  
Minnesota
    150       99       894,700       3,240       3.5  
Mississippi
    72       97       360,700       1,563       1.7  
Missouri
    61       95       634,900       2,174       2.4  
Montana
    2       100       30,000       77       0.1  
Nebraska
    19       95       196,300       488       0.5  
Nevada
    14       93       153,200       720       0.8  
New Hampshire
    14       100       109,900       588       0.6  
New Jersey
    33       100       261,300       1,944       2.1  
New Mexico
    9       100       58,400       211       0.2  
New York
    39       97       495,000       2,553       2.8  
North Carolina
    94       99       531,700       2,896       3.1  
North Dakota
    6       100       36,600       69       0.1  
Ohio
    136       94       846,200       3,224       3.5  
Oklahoma
    35       100       755,300       1,305       1.4  
Oregon
    18       94       297,300       929       1.0  
Pennsylvania
    98       99       677,200       3,556       3.9  
Rhode Island
    3       100       11,000       59       0.1  
South Carolina
    99       100       372,500       2,271       2.5  
South Dakota
    10       100       89,800       165       0.2  
Tennessee
    129       95       592,400       2,758       3.0  
Texas
    213       95       2,357,200       8,074       8.8  
Utah
    4       100       25,200       94       0.1  
Vermont
    4       100       12,700       129       0.1  
Virginia
    104       95       636,500       3,410       3.7  
Washington
    34       94       276,500       1,036       1.1  
West Virginia
    2       100       23,000       121       0.1  
Wisconsin
    27       93       269,200       869       0.9  
Wyoming
    1       0       5,400       0       0.0  
Totals/Average
    2,496       97 %     21,215,800     $ 92,162       100.0 %
 
* Less than 0.1%
 
 (1)
Includes rental revenue for all properties owned by Realty Income at December 31, 2010, including revenue from properties reclassified as discontinued operations of $98.  Excludes revenue of $80 from properties owned by Crest.
 
 
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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This annual report on Form 10-K, including the documents incorporated by reference herein, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. When used in this annual report, the words "estimated", "anticipated", "expect", "believe", "intend" and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include discussions of strategy, plans or intentions of management. Forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties, and assumptions about Realty Income Corporation, including, among other things:

  
Our anticipated growth strategies;
  
Our intention to acquire additional properties and the timing of these acquisitions;
  
Our intention to sell properties and the timing of these property sales;
  
Our intention to re-lease vacant properties;
  
Anticipated trends in our business, including trends in the market for long-term net-leases of freestanding, single-tenant properties;
  
Future expenditures for development projects; and
  
Profitability of our subsidiary, Crest.

Future events and actual results, financial and otherwise, may differ materially from the results discussed in the forward-looking statements.  In particular, some of the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially are:

  
Our continued qualification as a real estate investment trust;
  
General business and economic conditions;
  
Competition;
  
Fluctuating interest rates;
  
Access to debt and equity capital markets;
  
Continued volatility and uncertainty in the credit markets and broader financial markets;
  
Other risks inherent in the real estate business including tenant defaults, potential liability relating to environmental matters, illiquidity of real estate investments, and potential damages from natural disasters;
  
Impairments in the value of our real estate assets;
  
Changes in the tax laws of the United States of America;
  
The outcome of any legal proceedings to which we are a party; and
  
Acts of terrorism and war.

Additional factors that may cause risks and uncertainties include those discussed in the sections entitled "Business", "Risk Factors" and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in this annual report.

Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date that this annual report was filed with the SEC. While forward-looking statements reflect our good faith beliefs, they are not guarantees of future performance. We undertake no obligation to publicly release the results of any revisions to these forward-looking statements that may be made to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this annual report or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. In light of these risks and uncertainties, the forward-looking events discussed in this annual report might not occur.


Item 1A:                      Risk Factors

This "Risk Factors" section contains references to our "capital stock" and to our "stockholders."  Unless expressly stated otherwise, the references to our "capital stock" represent our common stock and any class or series of our preferred stock, while the references to our "stockholders" represent holders of our common stock and any class or series of our preferred stock.

In order to grow we need to continue to acquire investment properties.  The acquisition of investment properties may be subject to competitive pressures.
We face competition in the acquisition, operation and sale of property. We expect competition from:

  
Businesses;
  
Individuals;
  
Fiduciary accounts and plans; and
  
Other entities engaged in real estate investment and financing.

Some of these competitors are larger than we are and have greater financial resources. This competition may result in a higher cost for properties we wish to purchase.

Negative market conditions or adverse events affecting our existing or potential tenants, or the industries in which they operate, could have an adverse impact on our ability to attract new tenants, re-lease space, collect rent or renew leases, which could adversely affect our cash flow from operations and inhibit growth.
Cash flow from operations depends in part on the ability to lease space to tenants on economically favorable terms. We could be adversely affected by various facts and events over which we have limited or no control, such as:

  
Lack of demand in areas where our properties are located;
  
Inability to retain existing tenants and attract new tenants;
  
Oversupply of space and changes in market rental rates;
  
Declines in our tenants' creditworthiness and ability to pay rent, which may be affected by their operations, the current economic situation and competition within their industries from other operators;
  
Defaults by and bankruptcies of tenants, failure of tenants to pay rent on a timely basis, or failure of tenants to comply with their contractual obligations; and
  
Economic or physical decline of the areas where the properties are located.

At any time, any tenant may experience a downturn in its business that may weaken its operating results or overall financial condition. As a result, a tenant may delay lease commencement, fail to make rental payments when due, decline to extend a lease upon its expiration, become insolvent or declare bankruptcy. Any tenant bankruptcy or insolvency, leasing delay or failure to make rental payments when due could result in the termination of the tenant's lease and material losses to us.

If tenants do not renew their leases as they expire, we may not be able to rent or sell the properties.  Furthermore, leases that are renewed, and some new leases for properties that are re-leased, may have terms that are less economically favorable than expiring lease terms, or may require us to incur significant costs, such as renovations, tenant improvements or lease transaction costs. Negative market conditions may cause us to sell vacant properties for less than their carrying value, which could result in impairments. Any of these events could adversely affect cash flow from operations and our ability to make distributions to shareholders and service indebtedness. A significant portion of the costs of owning property, such as real estate taxes, insurance and maintenance, are not necessarily reduced when circumstances cause a decrease in rental revenue from the properties. In a weakened financial condition, tenants may not be able to pay these costs of ownership and we may be unable to recover these operating expenses from them.


Further, the occurrence of a tenant bankruptcy or insolvency could diminish the income we receive from the tenant's lease or leases. In addition, a bankruptcy court might authorize the tenant to terminate its leases with us. If that happens, our claim against the bankrupt tenant for unpaid future rent would be subject to statutory limitations that most likely would be substantially less than the remaining rent we are owed under the leases. In addition, any claim we have for unpaid past rent, if any, may not be paid in full. As a result, tenant bankruptcies may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.  Any of these events could adversely affect cash from operations and our ability to make distributions to stockholders and service indebtedness.

Eighty-four of our properties were available for lease or sale at December 31, 2010, of which all but one were single-tenant properties. At December 31, 2010, 32 of our properties under lease were unoccupied and available for sublease by the tenants, all of which were current with their rent and other obligations. During 2010, each of our tenants accounted for less than 10% of our rental revenue.

For the fourth quarter of 2010, our tenants in the restaurant and convenience store industries accounted for approximately 19.1% and 17.4%, respectively, of our rental revenue. A downturn in either of these industries, whether nationwide or limited to specific sectors of the United States could adversely affect tenants in these industries, which in turn could have a material adverse affect on our financial position, results of operations and our ability to pay the principal of and interest on our debt securities and other indebtedness and to make distributions on our common stock and preferred stock. Individually, each of the other industries in our property portfolio accounted for less than 10% of our rental revenue for the fourth quarter of 2010. Nevertheless, downturns in these other industries could also adversely affect our tenants, which in turn could also have a material adverse affect on our financial position, results of operations and our ability to pay the principal of and interest on our debt securities and other indebtedness and to make distributions on our common and preferred stock.  In addition, we may in the future make additional investments in the restaurant industry and convenience store industry, which would increase these industries’ percentages of our rental revenues, thereby increasing the effect that such a downturn in these industries would have on us.

In addition, a substantial number of our properties are leased to middle-market retail and other commercial enterprises that generally have more limited financial and other resources than certain upper-market retail and other commercial enterprises, and therefore, they are more likely to be adversely affected by a downturn in their respective businesses or in the regional or national economy.

Furthermore, we may make selected acquisitions of properties that fall outside our historical focus on freestanding, single-tenant, net-lease retail locations in the United States. We may be exposed to a variety of new risks by expanding into new property types and/or new jurisdictions outside the United States. These risks may include a limited knowledge and understanding of the industry in which the tenant operates, new types of real estate locations and lease structures, and new laws and culture of any non-U.S. jurisdiction.

As a property owner, we may be subject to unknown environmental liabilities.
Investments in real property can create a potential for environmental liability. An owner of property can face liability for environmental contamination created by the presence or discharge of hazardous substances on the property. We can face such liability regardless of:

  
Our knowledge of the contamination;
  
The timing of the contamination;
  
The cause of the contamination; or
  
The party responsible for the contamination of the property.

There may be environmental problems associated with our properties of which we are unaware. In that regard, a number of our properties are leased to operators of convenience stores that sell petroleum-based fuels, as well as to operators of oil change and tune-up facilities and operators that use chemicals and other waste products. These facilities, and some other of our properties, use, or may have used in the past, underground lifts or underground tanks for the storage of petroleum-based or waste products, which could create a potential for the release of hazardous substances.

 
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The presence of hazardous substances on a property may adversely affect our ability to lease or sell that property and we may incur substantial remediation costs. Although our leases generally require our tenants to operate in compliance with all applicable federal, state and local environmental laws, ordinances and regulations, and to indemnify us against any environmental liabilities arising from the tenants’ activities on the property, we could nevertheless be subject to strict liability by virtue of our ownership interest. There also can be no assurance that our tenants could or would satisfy their indemnification obligations under their leases. The discovery of environmental liabilities attached to our properties could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, our financial condition or our ability to make distributions to stockholders and to pay the principal of and interest on our debt securities and other indebtedness.

In addition, several of our properties were built during the period when asbestos was commonly used in building construction and other buildings with asbestos may be acquired by us in the future. Environmental laws govern the presence, maintenance and removal of asbestos-containing materials, or ACMs, and require that owners or operators of buildings containing asbestos properly manage and maintain the asbestos, that they adequately inform or train those who may come into contact with asbestos and that they undertake special precautions, including removal or other abatement in the event that asbestos is disturbed during renovation or demolition of a building. These laws may impose fines and penalties on building owners or operators for failure to comply with these requirements and may allow third parties to seek recovery from owners or operators for personal injury associated with exposure to asbestos fibers.

It is also possible that some of our properties may contain or develop harmful mold, which could lead to liability for adverse health effects and costs of remediation of the problem. When excessive moisture accumulates in buildings or on building materials, mold growth may occur, particularly if the moisture problem remains undiscovered or is not addressed over a period of time. Some molds may produce airborne toxins or irritants. Concern about indoor exposure to mold has been increasing, as exposure to mold may cause a variety of adverse health effects and symptoms, including allergic or other reactions. As a result, should our tenants or their employees or customers be exposed to mold at any of our properties we could be required to undertake a costly remediation program to contain or remove the mold from the affected property, which would reduce our cash available for distribution. In addition, exposure to mold by our tenants or others could expose us to liability if property damage or health concerns arise.

Compliance.  We have not been notified by any governmental authority, and are not otherwise aware, of any material noncompliance, liability or claim relating to hazardous substances, toxic substances, or petroleum products in connection with any of our present properties. In addition, we believe we are in compliance in all material respects with all present federal, state and local laws relating to ACMs. Nevertheless, if environmental contamination should exist, we could be subject to strict liability by virtue of our ownership interest.

Insurance and Indemnity.  In June 2005, we entered into a seven-year environmental insurance policy, or the June 2005 policy, which expires on June 1, 2012 on our property portfolio which replaced the previous five-year environmental insurance policy. The limits on our current policy are $10 million per occurrence, and $50 million in the aggregate, subject to a $40,000 self insurance retention, per occurrence, for properties with underground storage tanks and a $100,000 self insurance retention, per occurrence, for all other properties.

Additionally, in December 2009, we entered into a ten-year environmental insurance policy that expires in December 2019 that will initially act in an excess capacity to our June 2005 policy.  On June 1, 2012, this policy will become our primary environmental policy with the same limits as the June 2005 policy, except that once we pay a total of $1 million for self insurance retention, there will be a $50,000 per loss maintenance fee, rather than the $100,000 self insurance retention, per occurrence, for general environmental claims.

It is possible that our insurance could be insufficient to address any particular environmental situation and that, in the future, we could be unable to obtain insurance for environmental matters at a reasonable cost, or at all. Our tenants are generally responsible for, and indemnify us against, liabilities for environmental matters that occur on our properties.  For properties that have underground storage tanks, in addition to providing an indemnity in our favor, the tenants generally obtain environmental insurance or rely upon the state funds in the states where these properties are located to reimburse tenants for environmental remediation.

 
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If we fail to qualify as a real estate investment trust, the amount of dividends we are able to pay would decrease, which could adversely affect the market price of our capital stock and could adversely affect the value of our debt securities.
Commencing with our taxable year ended December 31, 1994, we believe that we have been organized and have operated, and we intend to continue to operate, so as to qualify as a "REIT" under Sections 856 through 860 of the Code. However, we cannot assure you that we have been organized or have operated in a manner that has satisfied the requirements for qualification as a REIT, or that we will continue to be organized or operate in a manner that will allow us to continue to qualify as a REIT.

Qualification as a REIT involves the satisfaction of numerous requirements under highly technical and complex Code provisions, for which there are only limited judicial and administrative interpretations, as well as the determination of various factual matters and circumstances not entirely within our control.

For example, in order to qualify as a REIT, at least 95% of our gross income in each year must be derived from qualifying sources, and we must pay distributions to stockholders aggregating annually at least 90% of our REIT taxable income (as defined in the Code and determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and by excluding net capital gains).

In the future, it is possible that legislation, new regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions will change the tax laws with respect to qualification as a REIT, or the federal income tax consequences of such qualification.

If we fail to satisfy all of the requirements for qualification as a REIT, we may be subject to certain penalty taxes or, in some circumstances, we may fail to qualify as a REIT.  If we were to fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year:

  
We would be required to pay federal income tax (including any applicable alternative minimum tax) on our taxable income at regular corporate rates;
  
We would not be allowed a deduction in computing our taxable income for amounts distributed to our stockholders;
  
We could be disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year during which qualification is lost;
  
We would no longer be required to make distributions to stockholders; and
  
This treatment would substantially reduce amounts available for investment or distribution to stockholders because of the additional tax liability for the years involved, which could have a material adverse effect on the market price of our capital stock and the value of our debt securities.

Even if we qualify for and maintain our REIT status, we may be subject to certain federal, state and local taxes on our income and property. For example, if we have net income from a prohibited transaction, that income will be subject to a 100% tax. Our subsidiary, Crest, is subject to federal and state taxes at the applicable tax rates on its income and property.

Distributions requirements imposed by law limit our flexibility.
To maintain our status as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we generally are required to distribute to our stockholders at least 90% of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and by excluding net capital gains each year. We also are subject to tax at regular corporate rates to the extent that we distribute less than 100% of our REIT taxable income (including net capital gains) each year.

In addition, we are subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax to the extent that we fail to distribute during any calendar year at least the sum of 85% of our ordinary income for that calendar year, 95% of our capital gain net income for the calendar year, and any amount of that income that was not distributed in prior years.


We intend to continue to make distributions to our stockholders to comply with the distribution requirements of the Code as well as to reduce our exposure to federal income taxes and the nondeductible excise tax. Differences in timing between the receipt of income and the payment of expenses to arrive at taxable income, along with the effect of required debt amortization payments, could require us to borrow funds on a short-term basis to meet the distribution requirements that are necessary to achieve the tax benefits associated with qualifying as a REIT.

Future issuances of equity securities could dilute the interest of holders of our common stock.
Our future growth will depend, in large part, upon our ability to raise additional capital. If we were to raise additional capital through the issuance of equity securities, we could dilute the interests of holders of our common stock. The interests of our common stockholders could also be diluted by the issuance of shares of common stock upon the exercise of outstanding options or pursuant to stock incentive plans. Likewise, our Board of Directors is authorized to cause us to issue preferred stock of any class or series (with dividend, voting and other rights as determined by the Board of Directors). Accordingly, the Board of Directors may authorize the issuance of preferred stock with voting, dividend and other similar rights that could dilute, or otherwise adversely affect, the interest of holders of our common stock.

We are subject to risks associated with debt and capital stock financing.
We intend to incur additional indebtedness in the future, including borrowings under our $425 million acquisition credit facility. At December 31, 2010, we had no borrowings outstanding under our $425 million acquisition credit facility and we had a total of $1.6 billion of outstanding unsecured senior debt securities. To the extent that new indebtedness is added to our current debt levels, the related risks that we now face would increase. As a result, we are and will be subject to risks associated with debt financing, including the risk that our cash flow could be insufficient to meet required payments on our debt. We also face variable interest rate risk as the interest rate on our $425 million credit facility is variable and could therefore increase over time.  We also face the risk that we may be unable to refinance or repay our debt as it comes due. Given the recent disruptions in the financial markets and the ongoing financial crisis in Europe (which relates primarily to concerns that certain European countries may be unable to repay their national debt), we also face the risk that one or more of the participants in our credit facility may not be able to lend us money.

In addition, our $425 million credit facility contains provisions that could limit or, in certain cases, prohibit the payment of distributions on our common stock and preferred stock.  In particular, our $425 million acquisition credit facility provides that, if an event of default (as defined in the credit facility) exists, neither we nor any of our subsidiaries may make any distributions on (except distributions payable in shares of a given class of our stock to the shareholders of that class), or repurchase or redeem, among other things, any shares of our common stock or preferred stock, during any period of four consecutive fiscal quarters in an aggregate amount in excess of the greater of:
 
  
The sum of (a) 95% of our adjusted funds from operations (as defined in the credit facility) for that period plus (b) the aggregate amount of cash distributions on our preferred stock for that period, and
  
The minimum amount of cash distributions required to be made to our shareholders in order to maintain our status as a REIT, for federal income tax purposes,

except that we may repurchase or redeem preferred stock with the net proceeds from the issuance of our common stock or preferred stock. The $425 million credit facility further provides that, in the event of a failure to pay principal, interest or any other amount payable thereunder when due or upon the occurrence of certain events of bankruptcy, insolvency or reorganization with respect to us or with respect to any of our subsidiaries that has guaranteed amounts payable under the credit facility or that meets a significance test set forth in the credit facility, we and our subsidiaries may not pay any distributions on (except distributions payable in shares of a given class of our stock to the shareholders of that class), or repurchase or redeem, among other things, any shares of our common stock or preferred stock.  If any such event of default were to occur, it would likely have a material adverse effect on the market price of our outstanding common and preferred stock and on the market value of our debt securities, and may adversely affect our ability to qualify, or prevent us from qualifying, as a REIT.


Our indebtedness could also have other important consequences to holders of our common and preferred stock, including:

  
Increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;
  
Limiting our ability to obtain additional financing to fund future working capital, capital expenditures and other general corporate requirements;
  
Requiring the use of a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations for the payment of principal and interest on our indebtedness, thereby reducing our ability to use our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures and general corporate requirements;
  
Limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and our industry; and
  
Putting us at a disadvantage compared to our competitors with less indebtedness.

Our business operations may not generate the cash needed to make distributions on our capital stock or to service our indebtedness.
Our ability to make distributions on our common stock and preferred stock and payments on our indebtedness, and to fund planned capital expenditures will depend on our ability to generate cash in the future.  We cannot assure you that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations or that future borrowings will be available to us in an amount sufficient to enable us to make distributions on our common stock and preferred stock, to pay our indebtedness, or to fund our other liquidity needs.

The market value of our capital stock and debt securities could be substantially affected by various factors.
The market value of our capital stock and debt securities will depend on many factors, which may change from time to time, including:

  
Prevailing interest rates, increases in which may have an adverse effect on the market value of our capital stock and debt securities;
  
The market for similar securities issued by other REITs;
  
General economic and financial market conditions;
  
The financial condition, performance and prospects of us, our tenants and our competitors;
  
Changes in financial estimates or recommendations by securities analysts with respect to us, our competitors or our industry;
  
Changes in our credit ratings; and
  
Actual or anticipated variations in quarterly operating results.

In addition, over the last three years, prices of common stock in the U.S. trading markets have been experiencing extreme price fluctuations, and the market price of our common stock has also fluctuated significantly during this period. As a result of these and other factors, investors who purchase our capital stock and debt securities may experience a decrease, which could be substantial and rapid, in the market value of our capital stock and debt securities, including decreases unrelated to our operating performance or prospects.

Real estate ownership is subject to particular economic conditions that may have a negative impact on our revenue.
We are subject to all of the inherent risks associated with the ownership of real estate.  In particular, we face the risk that rental revenue from our properties may be insufficient to cover all corporate operating expenses, debt service payments on indebtedness we incur and distributions on our capital stock. Additional real estate ownership risks include:

  
Adverse changes in general or local economic conditions;
  
Changes in supply of, or demand for, similar or competing properties;
  
Changes in interest rates and operating expenses;
  
Competition for tenants;
  
Changes in market rental rates;
  
Inability to lease properties upon termination of existing leases;
  
Renewal of leases at lower rental rates;
  
Inability to collect rents from tenants due to financial hardship, including bankruptcy;

 
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Changes in tax, real estate, zoning and environmental laws that may have an adverse impact upon the value of real estate;
  
Uninsured property liability;
  
Property damage or casualty losses;
  
Unexpected expenditures for capital improvements or to bring properties into compliance with applicable federal, state and local laws;
  
The need to periodically renovate and repair our properties;
  
Physical or weather-related damage to properties;
  
The potential risk of functional obsolescence of properties over time;
  
Acts of terrorism and war; and
  
Acts of God and other factors beyond the control of our management.
 
An uninsured loss or a loss that exceeds the policy limits on our properties could subject us to lost capital or revenue on those properties.
Under the terms and conditions of the leases currently in force on our properties, tenants generally are required to indemnify and hold us harmless from liabilities resulting from injury to persons, air, water, land or property, due to activities conducted on the properties, except for claims arising from the negligence or intentional misconduct of us or our agents. Additionally, tenants are generally required, at the tenant's expense, to obtain and keep in full force during the term of the lease, liability and property damage insurance policies. The insurance policies our tenants are required to maintain for property damage are generally in amounts not less than the full replacement cost of the improvements less slab, foundations, supports and other customarily excluded improvements. Our tenants are generally required to maintain general liability coverage varying between $1,000,000 and $10,000,000 depending on the tenant and the industry in which the tenant operates.

In addition to the indemnities and required insurance policies identified above, many of our properties are also covered by flood and earthquake insurance policies (subject to substantial deductibles) obtained and paid for by the tenants as part of their risk management programs. Additionally, we have obtained blanket liability, flood and earthquake (subject to substantial deductibles) and property damage insurance policies to protect us and our properties against loss should the indemnities and insurance policies provided by the tenants fail to restore the properties to their condition prior to a loss. However, should a loss occur that is uninsured or in an amount exceeding the combined aggregate limits for the policies noted above, or in the event of a loss that is subject to a substantial deductible under an insurance policy, we could lose all or part of our capital invested in, and anticipated revenue from, one or more of the properties, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition and on our ability to pay the principal of and interest on our debt securities and other indebtedness and to make distributions to our stockholders. Given the recent disruptions in the insurance industry, we also face the risk that our insurance carriers may not be able to provide payment under any potential claims that might arise under the terms of our insurance policies, and we may not have the ability to purchase insurance policies we desire.


Compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and fire, safety, and other regulations may require us to make unintended expenditures that could adversely impact our results of operations.
Our properties are generally required to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or the ADA. The ADA has separate compliance requirements for "public accommodations" and "commercial facilities," but generally requires that buildings be made accessible to people with disabilities. Compliance with the ADA requirements could require removal of access barriers and non-compliance could result in imposition of fines by the U.S. government or an award of damages to private litigants. The retailers to whom we lease properties are obligated by law to comply with the ADA provisions, and we believe that these retailers may be obligated to cover costs associated with compliance. If required changes involve greater expenditures than anticipated, or if the changes must be made on a more accelerated basis than anticipated, the ability of these retailers to cover costs could be adversely affected and we could be required to expend our own funds to comply with the provisions of the ADA, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition and our ability to pay the principal of and interest on our debt securities and other indebtedness and to make distributions to our stockholders. In addition, we are required to operate our properties in compliance with fire and safety regulations, building codes and other land use regulations, as they may be adopted by governmental agencies and bodies and become applicable to our properties. We may be required to make substantial capital expenditures to comply with those requirements and these expenditures could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition and our ability to pay the principal of and interest on our debt securities and other indebtedness and to make distributions to our stockholders.

Property taxes may increase without notice.
The real property taxes on our properties and any other properties that we develop or acquire in the future may increase as property tax rates change and as those properties are assessed or reassessed by tax authorities.

We depend on key personnel.
We depend on the efforts of our executive officers and key employees. The loss of the services of our executive officers and key employees could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition and on our ability to pay the principal and interest on our debt securities and other indebtedness and to make distributions to our stockholders. It is possible that we will not be able to recruit additional personnel with equivalent experience in the net-lease industry.

Terrorist attacks and other acts of violence or war may affect the value of our debt and equity securities, the markets in which we operate and our results of operations.
Terrorist attacks may negatively affect our operations, the market price of our capital stock and the value of our debt securities. There can be no assurance that there will not be further terrorist attacks against the United States or U.S. businesses. These attacks, or armed conflicts, may directly impact our physical facilities or the businesses of our tenants.

If events like these were to occur, they could cause consumer confidence and spending to decrease or result in increased volatility in the U.S. and worldwide financial markets and economy. They also could result in or prolong an economic recession in the U.S. or abroad. Any of these occurrences could have a significant adverse impact on our operating results and revenues and on the market price of our capital stock and on the value of our debt securities. It could also have an adverse effect on our ability to pay principal and interest on our debt securities or other indebtedness and to make distributions to our stockholders.


Disruptions in the financial markets could affect our ability to obtain financing on reasonable terms and have other adverse effects on us and the market price of our common stock.
Over the last three years, the United States stock and credit markets have experienced significant price volatility, dislocations and liquidity disruptions, which have caused market prices of many stocks and debt securities to fluctuate substantially and the spreads on prospective debt financings to widen considerably. More recently, the financial crisis in Europe (which relates primarily to concerns that certain European countries may be unable to pay their national debt) has had a similar, although less pronounced, effect. These circumstances have materially impacted liquidity in the financial markets, making terms for certain financings less attractive, and in certain cases have resulted in the unavailability of certain types of financing. Continued uncertainty in the stock and credit markets may negatively impact our ability to access additional financing at reasonable terms, which may negatively affect our ability to make acquisitions. A prolonged downturn in the stock or credit markets may cause us to seek alternative sources of potentially less attractive financing, and may require us to adjust our business plan accordingly. In addition, these factors may make it more difficult for us to sell properties or may adversely affect the price we receive for properties that we do sell, as prospective buyers may experience increased costs of financing or difficulties in obtaining financing. These events in the stock and credit markets may make it more difficult or costly for us to raise capital through the issuance of our common stock or preferred stock or debt securities. These disruptions in the financial markets also may have a material adverse effect on the market value of our common stock, preferred stock and debt securities, the income we receive from our properties and the lease rates we can charge for our properties, as well as other unknown adverse effects on us or the economy in general.

Inflation may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
Although inflation has not materially impacted our results of operations in the recent past, increased inflation could have a more pronounced negative impact on any variable rate debt we incur in the future and on our results of operations. During times when inflation is greater than increases in rent, as provided for in our leases, rent increases may not keep up with the rate of inflation. Likewise, even though net leases reduce our exposure to rising property expenses due to inflation, substantial inflationary pressures and increased costs may have an adverse impact on our tenants if increases in their operating expenses exceed increases in revenue, which may adversely affect the tenants' ability to pay rent.

Current volatility in market and economic conditions may impact the accuracy of the various estimates used in the preparation of our financial statements and footnotes to the financial statements.
Various estimates are used in the preparation of our financial statements, including estimates related to asset and liability valuations (or potential impairments), and various receivables. Often these estimates require the use of market data values which are currently difficult to assess, as well as estimates of future performance or receivables collectability which can also be difficult to accurately predict. Although management believes it has been prudent and used reasonable judgment in making these estimates, it is possible that actual results may differ from these estimates.
 
Changes in accounting standards may adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations.
The SEC is currently considering whether issuers in the U.S. should be required to prepare financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards, or IFRS, instead of U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP.  IFRS is a comprehensive set of accounting standards promulgated by the International Accounting Standards Board, or IASB, which are rapidly gaining worldwide acceptance.  The SEC has indicated that it will decide in 2011 whether IFRS will be required for U.S. issuers. If the SEC decides to require IFRS, it expects that U.S. issuers would first report under the new standards beginning in approximately 2015 or 2016, although the timeframe has not been finalized.  Additionally, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, is considering various changes to GAAP, some of which may be significant, as part of a joint effort with the IASB to converge accounting standards.  Although the FASB and IASB currently have a project on their agenda to examine the accounting for leases, the project may not result in the issuance of a final standard or a standard that would be comparable to current GAAP.  If IFRS is adopted, the potential issues associated with lease accounting, along with other potential changes associated with the adoption or convergence with IFRS, may adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations. 
 
 
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Item 1B:                   Unresolved Staff comments

There are no unresolved staff comments.

Item 2:                      Properties

Information pertaining to our properties can be found under Item 1.

Item 3:                      Legal Proceedings

We are subject to certain claims and lawsuits in the ordinary course of business, the outcome of which cannot be determined at this time. In the opinion of management, any liability we might incur upon the resolution of these claims and lawsuits will not, in the aggregate, have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.

Item 4:                      (Removed and Reserved)
 
PART II

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
A.  Our common stock is traded on the NYSE under the ticker symbol “O.” The following table shows the high and low sales prices per share for our common stock as reported by the NYSE, and distributions declared per share of common stock for the periods indicated.
 
   
Price Per Share
       
   
of Common Stock
   
Distributions
 
   
High
   
Low
   
Declared(1)
 
2010
                 
First quarter
  $ 31.18     $ 25.30     $ 0.4293125  
Second quarter
    34.53       28.42       0.4302500  
Third quarter
    34.79       29.12       0.4311875  
Fourth quarter
    35.97       32.92       0.4321250  
Total
                  $ 1.7228750  
2009
                       
First quarter
  $ 23.41     $ 14.26     $ 0.4255625  
Second quarter
    23.23       17.90       0.4265000  
Third quarter
    28.20       19.83       0.4274375  
Fourth quarter
    27.53       22.17       0.4283750  
Total
                  $ 1.7078750  
 
 (1) Common stock cash distributions currently are declared monthly by us based on financial results for the prior months.  At December 31, 2010, a distribution of $0.14425 per common share had been declared and was paid in January 2011.

There were 8,396 registered holders of record of our common stock as of December 31, 2010. We estimate that our total number of shareholders is approximately 100,000 when we include both registered and beneficial holders of our common stock.

During the fourth quarter of 2010, no shares of stock were withheld for state and federal payroll taxes on the vesting of stock awards, as permitted under the 2003 Incentive Award Plan of Realty Income Corporation.

 
Item 6:                      Selected Financial Data
 
(not covered by Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm)
 
(dollars in thousands, except for per share data)
 
As of or for the years ended December 31,
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006
 
Total assets (book value)
  $ 3,535,590     $ 2,914,787     $ 2,994,179     $ 3,077,352     $ 2,546,508  
Cash and cash equivalents
    17,607       10,026       46,815       193,101       10,573  
Lines of credit and notes payable
    1,600,000       1,354,600       1,370,000       1,470,000       920,000  
Total liabilities
    1,688,625       1,426,778       1,439,518       1,539,260       970,516  
Total stockholders’ equity
    1,846,965       1,488,009       1,554,661       1,538,092       1,575,992  
Net cash provided by operating activities
    243,368       226,707       246,155       318,169       86,945  
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
    7,581       (36,789 )     (146,286 )     182,528       (55,131 )
Total revenue
    345,009       325,245       325,041       288,650       230,940  
Income from continuing operations
    121,416       120,775       110,301       121,871       99,551  
Income from discontinued operations
    9,368       10,352       21,540       18,538       11,230  
Net income
    130,784       131,127       131,841       140,409       110,781  
Preferred stock cash dividends
    (24,253 )     (24,253 )     (24,253 )     (24,253 )     (11,362 )
Net income available to common stockholders
     106,531        106,874        107,588        116,156        99,419  
Cash distributions paid to common stockholders
     182,500        178,008        169,655        157,659        129,667  
Basic and diluted net income per common share
    1.01       1.03       1.06       1.16       1.11  
Cash distributions paid per common share
    1.721625       1.706625       1.662250       1.560250       1.437250  
Cash distributions declared per common share
     1.722875        1.707875        1.667250        1.570500        1.447500  
Basic weighted average number of common shares outstanding
     105,869,637        103,577,507        101,178,191        100,195,031        89,766,714  
Diluted weighted average number of common shares outstanding
     105,942,721        103,581,053        101,209,883        100,333,966        89,917,554  

 
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Item 7:                      Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

GENERAL

Realty Income Corporation, The Monthly Dividend Company®, is a Maryland corporation organized to operate as an equity real estate investment trust, or REIT. Our primary business objective is to generate dependable monthly cash distributions from a consistent and predictable level of funds from operations, or FFO, per share.  Our monthly distributions are supported by the cash flow from our portfolio of properties leased to retail and other commercial enterprises. We have in-house acquisition, leasing, legal, credit research, real estate research, portfolio management and capital markets expertise. Over the past 42 years, Realty Income and its predecessors have been acquiring and owning freestanding retail and other commercial properties that generate rental revenue under long-term lease agreements (primarily 15 to 20 years).

In addition, we seek to increase distributions to stockholders and FFO per share through both active portfolio management and the acquisition of additional properties.

At December 31, 2010, we owned a diversified portfolio:

  
Of 2,496 properties;
  
With an occupancy rate of 96.6%, or 2,412 properties occupied and only 84 properties available for lease;
  
Leased to 122 different retail and other commercial enterprises doing business in 32 separate industries;
  
Located in 49 states;
  
With over 21.2 million square feet of leasable space; and
  
With an average leasable space per property of approximately 8,500 square feet.

Of the 2,496 properties in the portfolio, 2,485, or 99.6%, are single-tenant properties, and the remaining 11 are multi-tenant, distribution and office properties. At December 31, 2010, of the 2,485 single-tenant properties, 2,402 were leased with a weighted average remaining lease term (excluding extension options) of approximately 11.4 years.

In addition, at December 31, 2010, our wholly-owned taxable REIT subsidiary, Crest Net Lease, Inc. ("Crest"), had an inventory of three properties valued at $3.0 million, which are classified as held for investment. No Crest properties are classified as held for sale at December 31, 2010. Crest was created to buy and sell properties, primarily to individual investors who are involved in tax-deferred exchanges under Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). In addition to the three properties, Crest also holds notes receivable of $22.1 million at December 31, 2010. Crest did not acquire any properties in 2010.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Capital Philosophy
Historically, we have met our long-term capital needs by issuing common stock, preferred stock and long-term unsecured notes and bonds. Over the long term, we believe that common stock should be the majority of our capital structure. However, we may issue additional preferred stock or debt securities from time to time. We may issue common stock when we believe that our share price is at a level that allows for the proceeds of any offering to be invested on an accretive basis into additional properties. In addition, we may issue common stock to permanently finance properties that were financed by our credit facility or debt securities. However, we cannot assure you that we will have access to the capital markets at times and at terms that are acceptable to us.


Conservative Capital Structure
We believe that our stockholders are best served by a conservative capital structure. Therefore, we seek to maintain a conservative debt level on our balance sheet and solid interest and fixed charge coverage ratios. At December 31, 2010, our total outstanding borrowings were $1.6 billion of senior unsecured notes, or approximately 26.7% of our total market capitalization of $5.99 billion. There were no outstanding borrowings on our credit facility at December 31, 2010.

We define our total market capitalization at December 31, 2010 as the sum of:
 
  
Shares of our common stock outstanding of 118,058,988 multiplied by the last reported NYSE sales price of $34.20 per share on December 31, 2010, or $4.04 billion;
  
Aggregate liquidation value (par value of $25 per share) of the Class D preferred stock of $127.5 million;
  
Aggregate liquidation value (par value of $25 per share) of the Class E preferred stock of $220 million; and
  
Outstanding notes of $1.6 billion.

Mortgage Debt
We have no mortgage debt on any of our properties.

$425 Million Acquisition Credit Facility
In December 2010, we entered into a new $425 million acquisition credit facility that replaced our previous $355 million acquisition credit facility that was scheduled to expire in May 2011. The initial term of the new credit facility expires in March 2014 and includes two, one-year extension options. Under the new credit facility, our investment grade credit ratings provide for financing at the London Interbank Offered Rate, commonly referred to as LIBOR, plus 185 basis points with a facility commitment fee of 35 basis points, for all-in drawn pricing of 220 basis points over LIBOR. The borrowing rate is not subject to a LIBOR floor.  We also have other interest rate options available to us. At December 31, 2010, we had a borrowing capacity of $425 million available on our credit facility and no o